Skip to main content

Students

Profil étudiants

You are

I am a candidate

You want to study in our school, find out how to apply!
Read more

I am an EJCAM's student

Discover the administrative and practical information to spend a good year!
Read more

I am a graduate

Stay in touch and submit an internship, job or work-study ad
Read more

Testimonials

  • Photo
    Mathilde Venceneux
    Mathilde Vinceneux
    Formation
    Master degree Journalism
    Promotion
    2016-2018
    Mathilde V. the journalist who relates "the depths of the human soul" on the radio. This is the title of the portrait created by Baya Drissi, student in the Master's program in Journalism, as part of the course taught by David Courbet, journalist-editor at AFP in Marseille. […] Read more
    Photo
    Mathilde Venceneux
    Mathilde Vinceneux
    Formation
    Master degree Journalism
    Promotion
    2016-2018

    Mathilde V. the journalist who relates "the depths of the human soul" on the radio. This is the title of the portrait created by Baya Drissi, student in the Master's program in Journalism, as part of the course taught by David Courbet, journalist-editor at AFP in Marseille.

    Golden hair, glasses on the nose, a broad smile, it probably doesn't mean anything to you, but her voice may sound familiar. Mathilde V. produces audio content for France Inter, Franceinfo and France Culture. A correspondent journalist in Marseille for Radio France, Mathilde is a 2018 graduate of EJCAM. Portrait of the woman who appears to be a lover of sound, editing and deciphering humans.

    "To be the eyes and ears of those who don't know the region" is how Mathilde defines her work as a correspondent in Marseille. It was the "desire to tell stories" that turned this philanthropist and ethnologist towards journalism. From the Pope's visit to Marseille in September 2023 to the introduction of uniforms in schools by Martine Vassal, president of the Aix-Marseille-Provence metropolis, Mathilde's radio reports often make the headlines.

    What makes a good correspondent? "Being versatile and an expert on a region," exclaims the 28-year-old. Knowing the area you're working in means you can tell stories in a different way. Meetings and contacts are the strength of the profession, "you feed off your personal life", she confides. But this is far from being a prerequisite, and Mathilde knows this, as she herself was not familiar with Marseille before studying there. Correspondence gives you freedom, from writing to editing, because "in radio, you're in control of a lot of things". Mathilde recently returned to Marseille to work as a correspondent after working in Paris for a few years. She has adapted to the rhythm of a job that is far from "comfortable". With its share of constraints and precariousness: "If there isn't a moment in your week when you don't say to yourself 'that was great', it's time to stop". "I tell myself I'll be a journalist until I'm sick of it", explains this daughter of a country doctor and a pharmacist.

    She had radio in her soul while she was still studying at EJCAM

    Mathilde competed for four journalism schools, and chose the one in Marseille. Initially, she wanted to go into print journalism, but feedback from the teaching staff and her own desires guided her choice towards radio. One of the things the journalist remembers most about her training is the unique opportunity to learn on the job, to be autonomous in her approach: "there's a lot of resourcefulness, you learn to tinker, you're not bossed around". After graduating, she was able to join Radio France and its "schedule", landing her first freelance contracts at France Bleu Provence in Marseille.
    Originally from Digne-les-Bains in Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, Mathilde immerses listeners in the city of Marseille and its problems. The Phocaean city is an adventure playground for journalists who, like her, like to write about societies: "people are very different and live together quite well. On the radio, nothing is "theatrical". It's the spontaneity of the medium that appeals to her. She masters the art and technique of any journalist to transcribe what she has witnessed, to bring the listener to a total sound immersion. What drives her above all is the search for balance, between creativity and imagination, and the need to render reality with verisimilitude, in the choice of sounds and atmospheres.

    Her studies in Montpellier, with a degree in sociology and then political science, as well as her background in ethnography, have given her the keys to "understanding society and people". The journalist's taste for sound and editing goes back to her high school days, when she opted for the cinema option. Mathilde's curiosity was piqued by the world of police and justice. "How do you work with sources who don't have the same right to express themselves as in other fields? She was a journalist in this department at France Inter in Paris from 2021 to 2023, for which she reported on numerous trials and honed her writing techniques. The challenge of journalism is to "replay dialogues on the radio, to recreate emotions".

    "You can be affected while treating such subject, you always leave feathers behind".

    For several weeks, immersed in a room for 10 hours a day, she attended the trial of Nordahl Lelandais, accused of committing several murders and sexual assaults on minors under the age of 15. The trial opened on January 31, 2022 before the Isère Assise Court. The most striking moment came when the criminal's best friend took the stand, painting a portrait of an ordinary man. Mathilde was intrigued: "The miscellaneous events in police justice tell the story of the depths of the human soul, of people confronted with the exceptional, the extreme". At that point, "it's like putting on a doctor's coat in a hospital: it's a choice to be there, and you can't let it overwhelm you, even if you identify with it".
    In this environment, journalists often come across the same cases, but the stories are not told with the same sensitivity. For Mathilde, "you can be affected while treating such subject, you always leave feathers behind". The process is sometimes perilous, as the journalist becomes personally and emotionally involved in the case. "We question ourselves, we run through the film a thousand times in our heads". The boundary between sensationalism, voyeurism and information is porous, but essential.

    Baya DRISSI
     

    Linkedin
  • Photo
    Jean-Marie Leforestier
    Jean-Marie Leforestier
    Formation
    Master degree Journalism
    Promotion
    2009-2011
    Jean-Marie Leforestier, the probity of facts and the rigor of investigation. It's the title of the portrait drawn up by Camille Micaelli, a student in the Journalism Master's program, as part of the course given by David Courbet, Journalist - AFP Editor at the Marseille office […] Read more
    Photo
    Jean-Marie Leforestier
    Jean-Marie Leforestier
    Formation
    Master degree Journalism
    Promotion
    2009-2011

    Jean-Marie Leforestier, the probity of facts and the rigor of investigation. It's the title of the portrait drawn up by Camille Micaelli, a student in the Journalism Master's program, as part of the course given by David Courbet, Journalist - AFP Editor at the Marseille office.
    Editor-in-chief of Marsactu since 2021, Jean-Marie Leforestier is the discreet face of local investigation in Marseille. Here's a look back at the career of this EJCAM alumnus.
    Jean-Marie Leforestier stands quietly in the hallway of the School of Journalisme and of Communication of Aix-Marseille, amidst revision rooms and a temperamental coffee machine. The bearded journalist gives rarely an interview.
    Ironically, he's unaware that the window opposite him proudly displays a number of trophies, including one in particular, a symbol of his student days. "Inter-school tournament, 2009". The engraving evokes glory, but not the twists and turns behind such a victory. Smiling, the journalist confides that he founded the school's soccer club the year he arrived, in 2009, and that he suffered a double fracture during the following year's tournament. He keeps that smile throughout an exchange rich in memories, undoubtedly awakened by the walls of a school he has been close to. Graduating in 2011, he has since swapped his student cap for that of a professor who has just finished his day of rigorously teaching the practice of investigation.
    It's hard to find a better client to talk to about investigation, the DNA of his journalistic practice. Already experienced at Ouest-France before joining the school, after graduating he began his career at Ravi, a satirical investigative newspaper in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region. A year later, in January 2012, he joined Marsactu. This pure player specialising in local investigation has, in the space of a decade, carved out a place for itself in a media space dominated by La Provence. Its investigations into substandard housing prior to the rue d'Aubagne tragedy had subsequently propelled the title to national prominence. In 2015, the editorial team saved the paper from bankruptcy by buying it out. Behind this rescue lies a radical change in business model. At a time when Mediapart was emerging on the national scene, the subscription model was the obvious choice. It enabled the newspaper to free itself from a major lever of pressure, advertising, which had hitherto hindered it. 
    Although he is not fond of militant journalism, Jean-Marie Leforestier does not deny his convictions. The strongest of these is that he is not financed by the subjects he covers. Even as a student, he found it hard not to "question the frameworks into which he was asked to fit". It's a mentality that sums up the credo of Marsactu, the "local democratic watchdog" of which he is now, at 36, editor-in-chief. 
    On a daily basis, he leads a team of eight permanent journalists, including himself, as well as a number of freelancers. A common spirit runs through the editorial team: a taste for public affairs, which he has personally cultivated for as long as he can remember. "We must always remember that we're here first and foremost to dissect facts rather than relay opinions," he says in a soft voice. But this work, he realises, comes at a price. "It's a fascinating and rewarding life, but extremely time-consuming". As a young father, he realises the difference that sometimes separates him from those around him because of his schedule. It also takes time to investigate, a practice that requires patience, rigor and a substantial personal investment. "It's essential at a time when media space is saturated by the immediacy of 24-hour news channels. 
    Marsactu was built on the original color of journalism, which must be "the primacy of facts in the exercise of the profession". The long investigation allows us to pause for a moment, which is beneficial for deciphering the news and for the readers who will benefit from it.
    Outside his job, he has no passion for "electric trains", nor any attraction for "weird things". The son of a nurse working with the underprivileged and a computer technician, he remembers that there were hardly any newspapers in his Breton home. Contrary to popular belief, as a child he likes Thierry Roland than Tintin. He sums up his "childhood influences" as his special relationship with television, and sports journalism to be precise. At the age of "four or five", Jean-Marie used to turn his father's screwdriver upside down, like a microphone, to comment soccer matches on television. He has a smile on his face when he recalls this memory. He didn't end up following the career of Didier Roustan, his idol at the time, but admits that sports journalism was his "gateway" to his future profession, without ever having practiced it in this way.


    Camille MICAELLI

    Linkedin
  • Photo
    Enzo Léardi
    Enzo Léardi
    Formation
    Master degree Data and digital communication
    Promotion
    2018-2020
    Today, we present to you Enzo Léardi, communications officer at the University Institute of Technology of Aix-Marseille, Saint Jérôme site. A graduate of the Aix-Marseille School of Journalism and Communication in 2020, Enzo had previously completed a Master's degree in Data, Information and Digital Commun […] Read more
    Photo
    Enzo Léardi
    Enzo Léardi
    Formation
    Master degree Data and digital communication
    Promotion
    2018-2020

    Today, we present to you Enzo Léardi, communications officer at the University Institute of Technology of Aix-Marseille, Saint Jérôme site. A graduate of the Aix-Marseille School of Journalism and Communication in 2020, Enzo had previously completed a Master's degree in Data, Information and Digital Communication.
    In the following video, he talks about his experiences, particularly at EJCAM.
    This video was produced as part of a tutored professional project by BENBRAHIM Sofia, BOURAS Amani, EL GHAIATI Najoua and HANOUCH Amina, students at EJCAM.

     

    Linkedin

Practical life

Indispensable information to facilitate your daily life and improve your student life.
Read more

Student Productions

Reports, press articles, videos, podcasts, exhibition... Consult the works realized by our students during their training.
Read more